Tygers Of Pan Tang: The Wreck Age/Burning In The Shade-80’s-1985-1987-2022.

Tygers Of Pan Tang:NWOBHM

Discography:

Don’t Touch Me ThereEP1979
Rock ‘n’ Roll Man / Alright on the NightSingle1980 
Suzie Smiled / TushSingle1980 
Wild CatFull-length1980
Euthanasia / Straight as a DieSingle1980 
Hellbound / Don’t Give a DamnSingle1981 
SpellboundFull-length1981
The Story So FarEP1981 
Don’t Stop By / Slave to FreedomSingle1981 
Love Don’t Stay / Paradise DriveSingle1981 
Crazy NightsFull-length1981
Heavy Metal ’82Split1982 
Tygers of Pan TangCompilation1982 
Do It GoodSingle1982 
Lonely at the TopSingle1982 
RendezvousSingle1982 
Love Potion No. 9Single1982 
The CageFull-length1982
Paris by AirSingle1982 
Making TracksSingle1982 
Live & Singles + 3Compilation1984 
The Best of Tygers of Pan TangCompilation1984 
The Wreck-AgeFull-length1985
First KillCompilation1986 
Burning in the ShadeFull-length1987
HellboundCompilation1989 
SinglesCompilation1992 
The Best of Tygers of Pan Tang: On the ProwlCompilation1999 
MysticalFull-length2001
Live at WackenLive album2001
Live at Nottingham Rock CityLive album2001 
CybernationDemo2002 
Live in the RoarLive album2003 
The Second WaveSplit2003 
Noises from the CathouseFull-length2004
Vision from the CathouseVideo2004 
DetonatedCompilation2005
Leg of the Boot: Live in HollandLive album2005 
Big Game Hunting (The Rarities)Compilation2005 
Bad Bad KittyCompilation2005 
Back & BeyondEP2007 
Animal InstinctFull-length2008
The Wildcat SessionsEP2010 
The Spellbound Sessions – 30th Anniversary Special EditionEP2011 
Tygers of Pan Tang ‎– The Greatest Years 1979-1983Boxed set2011 
AmbushFull-length2012
The Crazy Nights Sessions (30th Anniversary Special Edition)EP2014 
Tygers Sessions: The First WaveCompilation2015 
Only the BraveEP2016 
Tygers of Pan TangFull-length2016
Never Give InSingle2017 
The MCA YearsBoxed set2017 
Hellbound. Spellbound Live 1981Live album2018 
White LinesSingle2019 
RitualFull-length2019
Majors & MinorsCompilation2021
A New HeartbeatEP2022
The Wreck-Age / Burning in the Shade 1985-1987Compilation2022 

Members:

Robb WeirGuitars (1978-1983, 1999-present)
Craig EllisDrums (2000-present)
Jacopo MeilleVocals (2004-present)
See also: Damn Freaks, General Stratocuster and the Marshals, Mantra, Norge, Sainted Sinners, ex-Mad Mice
Francesco MarrasGuitars (2020-present)
See also: Screaming ShadowsVerde Lauro, ex-Survivors, ex-Eruption (Ita)
Huw HoldingBass (2021-present)
See also: Holosade, ex-Cardinal Synne, Maiden UK / Higher on Maiden, ex-Avenger, ex-Blitzkrieg, ex-Nord, ex-Order of the Black Sun, ex-Maiden England

Past Members:

RockyBass (1978-1983)
Brian DickDrums (1978-1983, 1985-1987)
Jess CoxVocals (1978-1980)
See also: ex-Jess Cox, ex-Lionheart
Mark ButcherVocals (1978)
John SykesGuitars (lead) (1980-1982)
See also: John Sykes, ex-Thin Lizzy, ex-Streetfighter, ex-Blue Murder, ex-John Sloman’s Badlands, ex-Whitesnake
John DeverillVocals (1981-1983, 1984, 1985-1987)
See also: ex-Persian Risk, ex-Square World, ex-Waysted
Fred PurserGuitars (lead) (1982-1983)
See also: ex-Holosade, ex-Lies of Smiles, ex-Warfare, ex-Penetration
Colin IrwinBass (1983-1984, 1985)
Neil ShepherdGuitars (1984, 1985-1987)
See also: ex-Apes, Pigs & Spacemen, ex-Jess Cox Band, ex-Waysted
Steve LambGuitars (1984, 1985-1987)
Dave DonaldsonBass (1985-1987)
See also: ex-Tokyo Blade, ex-Jess Cox
Brian WestBass (2000-2012)
DeanoGuitars (2000-2013)
Tony LiddellVocals (2000-2004)
See also: ex-Strangeways
Richie WicksVocals (2004)
See also: ex-Angel Witch, ex-ShadowKeep, ex-Kevin Riddles’ Baphomet, ex-Sire
Gavin GrayBass (2012-2021)
See also: ex-Blitzkrieg, ex-The Almighty
Micky CrystalGuitars (2013-2020)
Disc 1 – The Wreck-Age
1.Waiting 
2.Protection 
3.Innocent Eyes 
4.Desert of no Love 
5.The Wreck-Age 
6.Women in Cages 
7.Victim 
8.Ready to Run 
9.All Change Faces 
10.Forgive and Forget 
Disc 2 – Burning in the Shade
1.The First (The Only One) 
2.Hit It 
3.Dream Ticket 
4.Sweet Lies 
5.Maria 
6.Hideaway 
7.Open to Seduction 
8.The Circle of the Dance 
9.Are You There 
10.The Memory Fades 
Disc 3 – The Wreck-Age Demos / Burning in the Shade Demos
1.Forgive and Forget 
2.Not Guilty 
3.Undercurrent 
4.The Wreck-Age 
5.You’re on Your Own 
6.Time to Regret 
7.Slow Recovery 
8.The Face of Innocence 
9.Shadow of the Past 
10.Waiting 
11.Are You There? 
12.The Circle of the Dance 
13.Don’t Think I Could Leave 
14.Hideaway 
15.Hit It 
16.Never Say Never 
17.The Memory Fades

2 thoughts on “Tygers Of Pan Tang: The Wreck Age/Burning In The Shade-80’s-1985-1987-2022.

  1. hells_unicorn, December 30th, 2010
    Written based on this version: 2001, CD, Spitfire Records (Reissue)

    Metal purists are often quick to jump on the mid 80s era of Tygers Of Pan Tang as being a period of lifeless pop/rock party music, or a sort of lame Def Leppard tribute band post-“High N’ Dry” era. While this time period saw the former NWOBHM helmsmen backing out of metal completely, that doesn’t necessarily make their music worthless, although it has to be judged in light of what it is. Many bands from the period, including Saxon and Persian Risk went this route for a while, following the lead of Rainbow and later the reformed Deep Purple, Journey, and several others who found themselves loading up stadiums with a lighter kind of rock music that was, to put it mildly, a simplified and keyboard heavy version of the 70s AOR bands.

    Being able to enjoy “The Wreck-Age” in any capacity would have to include being able to tolerate an album like “Street Of Dreams”, “Our Kingdom” and perhaps even the later 80s work that Swedish glam band Alien put forth. It’s still a guitar oriented style and there are plenty of fancy leads and a few good riffs here and there, but the increased emphasis on vocal work and the restrained level of crunch in the guitar sound gives this that spacey sort of feel that takes most of the edge out of the listen. It’s fairly entertaining music, but it’s also very safe music, and often comes off as oversimplified and one-dimensional. The accusations of women claiming that men only think about sex aren’t too far off here, whereas in the metal world there’s a bit more leeway on lyrical subjects.

    There are a handful of solid party songs on here, which occasionally cross over into early 80s Rainbow territory, but don’t venture too much beyond. “Women In Cages” and “Innocent Eyes” are both heavily reminiscent of the collaboration of Joe Lynn Turner and Ritchie Blackmore, loaded up with cheesy melodic clichés, but doesn’t hold back and pretty much takes it to its logical conclusion. I can definitely understand why most metal heads would hate these songs, but under certain circumstances (like being in my car alone), I might be possessed to sing along (did I just say that out loud?). “The Wreck-Age” is essentially the zenith of the album, and probably the only thing on here that sounds remotely close to a metal song. It cooks with about as much ferocity as one of the lighter speedy songs on Dokken’s “Tooth And Nail”, and it’s loaded with pop hooks, but it’s a fun listen.

    For what this is, it’s a pretty solid release, but this is basically a no-fly zone for people who were absolutely in love with “Wildcat” and “Spellbound” and can’t imagine the band leaving that sound. There’s little grit here, not much edge, and surprisingly no sleaze to speak of, just a straight up big haired approach to rock music where the men tried to look hotter than the women in order to get in bed with them. I wouldn’t put it in the same league as Dokken or Rainbow, but it isn’t too bad. You can either stand in utter perplexity at what people must have been thinking back then, or you can just not think about it and enjoy the music, either way the album basically speaks for itself.

    Like

  2. Empyreal, January 2nd, 2011

    Excruciating pain is not something people often willingly partake in, but sometimes it just happens by accident. I had no idea what I was getting into when I first turned on this album, called Burning in the Shade, from that veritable English poof-metal outfit Tygers of Pan Tang, but let me tell you, it’s been a hell of a trip. There aren’t many albums where I turn them on while doing something else and then pause more than once during every song to stare in gaping awe at my computer, in a mix of disgust and complete bafflement. There aren’t many albums which literally render me speechless because there are just so many things wrong with them that it’s hard to figure out where to start. This is one of those albums, people.

    I mean WOW, this is shit. You think Saxon’s Destiny and Scorpions’ Savage Amusement were bad? This makes those albums look like fucking masterworks in comparison! I literally am having a hard time even articulating the amount of ear-raping, lowest-common-denominator pandering that this album has. It’s practically Guinness-worthy; it’s like a goddamn landmark in moldy, maggot-infested, 9-month old 80s cheese. No substance, no dignity, just a trip down the parabolic slide of musical quality as steep as Mount Everest is tall.

    Let’s just start from the top. The songwriting is just shit. Opener “The First” has a big, catchy 80s style chorus, but that’s…literally all it has. The music underneath is as vapid as can be, with forgettable riffs and bargain bin synthesizers that sort of shuffle around like lost kids at an amusement park. There’s even one bit 2 minutes in where the music just kind of abruptly stops and the chorus is hastily pasted in like the band didn’t know what to do. Like they literally just ran out of ideas, so they said, “hey, let’s just put the chorus in again. Need to get the song up to 3 minutes somehow!” How lazy are these assholes?

    Further songs deteriorate even more into vapid, hair sprayed slop that even the worst of Def Leppard wouldn’t touch. It’s a frighteningly dull and thoughtless escapade, without any hook or melody that isn’t either unmemorable or insanely annoying. It just keeps coming, relentlessly drilling the annoyance into your head without stopping. I cannot believe how grating this is; didn’t anyone think to tell these guys to stop what they were doing and really think about the direction they were taking? Maybe convince them to re-listen to, oh, ANY OF THEIR OTHER MATERIAL AT ALL and re-attach their heads to the rest of their bodies?

    The songs take already poor ideas and decide they want to rape them by repeating them over and over again. It’s just torture! Listen to “Hit It,” or maybe “Hideaway” – really listen to those hooks. There’s no enjoyment value there. I can’t actually say that very often, but I’m pretty positive on this: there is no actual enjoyment value to be had listening to the songs on this album. If you listen closely enough to the wretched fanfares blaring from the keys and the obnoxious choruses, you can actually hear the band trying to get you to like them. You can actually hear them pandering to the lowest maggots that ever bought a 80s rock record. I can’t decide whether that’s fascinating or sad. Probably a little of both.

    “Are You There?” is as horrible as any 80s metal band ever conceived of, with overly loud clattering from the powerless, enervated guitars that fails to conjure up any emotional response besides unfathomable rage, and vocals that are as shrill as those of a dying cat. “Dream Ticket”…probably the wussiest, most ball-less song ever written by a metal band. “Sweet Lies” chugs out fourth rate riffs that even the Sunset Strip bands would wipe their asses with, and “Open to Seduction” kind of sums up the entire album – not because of any musical means, but because it’s truthful. The band is, indeed, open to seduction, putting out even the most vapid and commercial tripe imaginable just to be appreciated. Well, guys…it backfired.

    And the ballads! You think the rest of this is bad, well, wait til you hear these! “Maria” and “The Memory Fades” are just the kinds of songs you can’t describe with words. Let’s just say that, with all their lack of any kind of direction and flow, vomit-worthy, torturous exercises in shiny, glittery tin-foil synths and guitars and wailing, eunuch-style castrati moaning…there was a lot of cleansing done afterward. Think of that scene from Ace Ventura when Jim Carrey makes his big discovery about Einhorn. That’s about the size of it.

    And that goes for this whole fucking travesty in general. This sucks, Tygers of Pan Tang deserved their 15+ year hiatus after it, and if you like it, you need help. God, what a horrible trip. I can’t think of something I’ve been more glad to be done with recently.

    Like

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